Course Descriptions

Accounting & Information Systems

A510 Financial Accounting Theory & Practice I 3 cr.
Prerequisite: A 201
An intermediate financial accounting course emphasizing financial statement preparation and analysis. Includes intermediate theory and problems, asset valuation, and income measurement, preparation and analysis of financial statements.
A511 Financial Accounting Theory & Practice II 3 cr.
Prerequisite: A 510 or equivalent
Application of intermediate accounting theory to problems involving long-term liabilities, corporations, earnings per share, tax allocation, pensions, leases, and cash flows.
A514 Auditing Theory & Practice 3 cr.
Prerequisite: A 511 or permission
This course addresses the concepts and procedures related to the implementation of the external and internal audits for business organizations. Coverage includes issuance of the audit report, reviews of internal control, statistical sampling, EDP systems and the company's business cycles. Additional topics include forensic accounting, auditing for fraud and other assurance services. Many topics covered are included on the uniform CPA examination given by the AICPA.
A515 Federal Income Taxes 3 cr.
Prerequisite: none
Introduction to federal income taxation. Focus is on the income taxation of individuals and tax planning for individuals.
A516 Federal Estate and Gift Taxation 3 cr.
Prerequisite: A 515
Tax treatment of wealth transfers at death (the estate tax) and during lifetime (the gift tax), with emphasis on estate planning. Also includes an examination of the income taxation of estates and trusts.
A522 Federal Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 3 cr.
Prerequisite: A 515
Tax aspects of the formation, operation, liquidation, and termination of partnerships and limited liability companies.
A523 Business Information Systems 3 cr.
Prerequisite: none
An overview of accounting systems and their existence within businesses. The course includes discussions of system controls, transaction processing, business cycles and issues related to development and installation of automated accounting systems.
A524 Managing Accounting Information for Decision-making 3 cr.
Prerequisite: A 201 or A 501
Provides a user-oriented understanding of how accounting information should be managed to ensure its availability on a timely and relevant basis for decision making. Focus is on cost-benefit analysis for evaluating potential value-added results from planning, organizing, and controlling a firm's accounting information. Group participation and computer support is used extensively. For MBA students enrolled in Module IA.
A551 Tax Research 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: A 515 or concurrent (online course)
Covers how to access the primary and secondary sources of tax law, including the Internal Revenue Code, regulations and other administrative pronouncements and judicial decisions. Explains the research process and the use of research tools to locate sources of tax law. Utilizes both paper products and electronic (internet) resources. Emphasizes how to read and interpret source materials. Tax research assignments stress writing skills and the need for effective communication of research findings.
A590 Independent Study in Accounting cr. arr.
For advanced M.B.A. students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the M.B.A. Office and the student's faculty advisor.
S 590 Independent Study in Management Information Systems cr. arr.
For advanced M.B.A. students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the M.B.A. Office and the student's faculty advisor.

ADC / Online

K510 Advanced Decision Models 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: MBA Module 1A
This course is concerned with optimization modeling. Topics covered are optimal product mix, project scheduling, aggregate planning, financial models, capital budgeting, optimal portfolio mix and multiple objectives optimization. This is an ADC course administered entirely through Oncourse, but it is not self-paced.
K516 Quantitative Decision Models 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: MBA Module 1A
This course is concerned with probability and statistical modeling. Topics covered are the application of regression-based forecasting models, simulation models and probabilistic causal models. This is an ADC course administered entirely through Oncourse, but it is not self-paced.
F528 Fixed-Income Investments 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 520
A web-based course utilizing an external text and bond valuation software. The course explores the broad class of fixed-income securities, the determinants of risk and pricing, theories of the term structure, and the management of portfolios of fixed income securities. Theoretical material is developed, but assignments will emphasize professional applications.
F529 Equity Markets 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 520
Web-based course utilizing an external text and equity analysis software. The conceptual and analytical frameworks for investing in equity securities are presented in this course. Coverage includes an overview of the security markets, equity valuation, investment strategies, and portfolio management for individuals and institutions. International equity investing is discussed in global portfolio context.
M503 Applied Marketing Research 3 cr.
Prerequisite: M 501
The basic objective of this course is to develop the student's understanding of marketing research as it applies to marketing decision making. The course covers principles of qualitative, experimental and survey research designs, secondary and syndicated data sources, and questionnaire design. The major focus will be on the tools used to properly collect market research information. This course is required for Marketing major.
S555 Info Technology for Managers 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: none
This Web-based course provides a foundation of knowledge necessary to successfully navigate today’s technology-intensive corporate environment.  The course explores the various types of systems including Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems as well as issues involved in the analysis, design, and implementation of information technology (IT) systems. Recent trends in technology including social media (e.g., Facebook and Twitter) will also be examined.  The ultimate goal of the course is to give managers a deeper understanding of IT in two broad areas:  how IT systems can be used to achieve competitive advantage and how IT systems can be used to improve knowledge sharing and decision making. 
W525 New Ventures and the Venture Community of Indianapolis 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: J 501
This course is designed to support and encourage student participation in the Venture Club monthly lunch meetings. The Venture Club is a group of venture capitalists, entrepreneurs, bankers, consultants, and service providers (accountants, lawyers, etc.) who meet on a monthly basis in downtown Indianapolis. Meetings typically consist of a brief networking session, followed by two or three presentations by entrepreneurs seeking funding for business concepts, and a guest speaker. Sessions last a total of two hours, and have approximately 200 attendees. Following a brief meeting at the beginning of the semester, students would attend the monthly meetings of the Venture Club (September through April for 8 meetings, 16 hours) and participate in online chat sessions following the meeting. Each meeting would have an associated reading from Harvard Business Review, or a similar journal related to new venture development and financing. Note: this course is generally offered in an ADC or online format.

Business Law

L512 Law and Ethics in Business 3 cr.
The objective is to provide the student of management with that knowledge of the American legal system--its processes and the substantive law itself--which is necessary to the making of informed and effective business decisions. Because the law develops and evolves in response to changing social, economic, political, and technological forces, and because business decisions often carry long-lasting as well as delayed effects, this course will emphasize the study of legal change. It is hoped that consideration of past legal developments will give prospective managers sufficient insight into the dynamics of this process to enable them to predict as soundly as possible the future legal environment in which their present decisions will bear fruit. For MBA students enrolled in Summer Module IS.
L590 Independent Study in Business Law cr. arr.
For advanced M.B.A. students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the M.B.A. Office and the student's faculty advisor.

Economics

G511 Microeconomics for Managers 1.5 cr.
Prerequisites: G 502
This course develops basic skills in analysis of industry and market structure, employment of game theory in the construction of competitive strategy, and determination of optimal prices for the sale of goods and services. Specific topics include oligopoly, antitrust regulation, price discrimination, product bundling, and predatory pricing. Students will gain advanced knowledge of how to use prices and market position to maintain an advantage over competitors that maximizes profits.
G512 Macroeconomics for Managers 1.5 cr.
An integrated curriculum that teaches students how to take inventory of the nation's economic position, understand the impact of government actors, and forecast political and economic variables important to the firm. Specific topics covered include national income accounting, determination of GDP and inflation, measurement of unemployment, impacts of fiscal and monetary policies, movement and term structure of interest rates, consequences of government debt, and exchange rates and their linkage to the balance of payments. Students leave the course with a fundamental understanding of the national assets that expand production capacity and national liabilities that stunt opportunity for economic growth.
G590 Independent Study in Business Economics and Public Policy cr. arr.
For advanced M.B.A. students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the M.B.A. Office and the student's faculty advisor.

Finance

F509 Financial Analysis for Corporate Decisions 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 523
This course develops a working knowledge of capital budgeting. The beginning of the course focuses on the application of traditional capital budgeting criteria, the determination of cash flows for capital budgeting purposes, and the determination of the appropriate cost of capital. Next, alternative methodologies/concepts such as Adjusted Present Value (APV), Economic Value Added (EVA), and valuing investment opportunities as Real Options are examined. Case studies are utilized to emphasize how these techniques can be applied to improve the capital allocation process.
F517 Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 523
This course will examine venture capital in financing entrepreneurial growth companies, how venture capital is raised, invested, and then harvested for reinvestment; how professional venture capitalists analyze and structure potential investments; how and when portfolio companies should execute an exit.
F520 Asset Valuation and Strategy 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 523
The course begins with an introduction to the primary and secondary markets with an emphasis on the equity markets. Basic theories for valuing equity and derivative securities are presented. Covered in the equity arena are the Capital Asset Pricing Model, Arbitrage Pricing Theory, and empirical tests of these models. Basic options, forwards, and futures are applied as risk management techniques in the equity and currency markets. Required course for finance majors.
F523 Financial Management 3 cr.
Provides a working knowledge of the tools and analytical conventions used in the practice of corporate finance; establishes an understanding of the basic elements of financial theory to be used in application of analytical reasoning to business problems; and explores the interrelationship among corporate policies and decisions. Course work will include problem sets, study group preparation of executive summary memos and critiques, and use of PC spreadsheets to develop a planning model for a case focusing on funds requirement. For MBA students enrolled in Module 1B.
F525 Corporate Financial Risk Management 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 520 or concurrent, F 526 recommended
This course provides an introduction to risk management strategies. We will focus on two key questions: First, why is risk management important? Second, how can risk management strategies be implemented? The course will make extensive use of derivatives as risk management tools, but no technical knowledge of derivatives is required. Students will be introduced to commercial software such as JP Morgan's Riskmetrics and Creditmetrics. Bus F 526 is recommended, but not required.
F526 Derivative Securities 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 520 or concurrent
This course provides an introduction to derivative securities. We will focus on understanding the basic types of derivatives such as futures contracts, swaps, and options. We will make extensive use of the Binomial and Black-Scholes models for pricing options. No prior knowledge of derivatives is required and we will keep the mathematics to the essentials.
F528 Fixed Income Investments 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 520
Explores the broad class of fixed income securities, the determinants of risk and pricing, theories of the term structure, and the management of portfolios of fixed income securities. Theoretical material is developed in the context of the market for treasury securities. The later part of the course is on institutional foundations of corporate bond, municipal bond, and mortgage-backed securities markets, as well as how the concepts are adapted to the valuation and management of these more complex securities.
F529 Equity Markets 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 520
The conceptual and analytical framework for investing in equity securities are presented in this course. Coverage includes an overview of the security markets, equity valuation, investment strategies, and portfolio management for individuals and institutions. International equity investing is discussed in global portfolio context. Numerous examples are used to illustrate the practical application of valuation models and strategies.
F540 The Firm in the Capital Market 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 523
An introduction to the fixed income markets and the derivative securities used to hedge interest rate risk is presented. The price/yield relationship, term structure of interest rates, and interest rate risk measurement are emphasized. Forwards, futures, options and swaps are presented as risk management tools. Required course for finance majors.
F548 Corporate Governance and Restructuring 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 523
This course is designed to promote greater understanding of mergers and acquisitions, restructurings, and corporate governance activities. This includes exploring the theory and evidence regarding the motives for M&A/restructuring transactions, the sources of value-added, and managerial incentives to engage in or resist these activities. Participants will learn how to apply discounted cash flow techniques for valuation purposes. Case studies are utilized to incorporate financial theory and valuation techniques in real-world situations.
F570 International Financial Markets 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 523
This course examines the international financial markets in which firms and investors operate and discusses how to assess the opportunities and risks of those markets. Topics to be discussed include balance of payments, international arbitrage relationships, exchange rate determination, currency crises, and international asset diversification
F571 International Corporate Finance 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 523, F 570
This course examines how firms and investors manage their operations or investments in an international environment. Topics to be discussed include foreign exchange risk management, financing the global firm, foreign investment decisions, and multinational capital budgeting.
F 590 Independent Study in Finance cr. arr.
For advanced M.B.A. students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the M.B.A. Office and the student's faculty advisor.

Management

BE599 Emerging Economies: Russia Course and Study Tour 2011 3 cr.
This year’s Emerging Economies Spring Course and Study Tour 2011 to Russia represents one of the most exciting international programs at Kelley Indianapolis and will include business meetings, factory tours, and cultural events.  The focus of the program is to internationalize business professionals and to expose them to one of the largest emerging markets.  Class meetings will be on Monday evenings prior to the spring break trip will address the background and business environment of Russia, and major team project reports will be due after the trip is completed.  Tentatively the schedule will be to leave the U.S. in the afternoon of Friday March 11 for St. Petersburg, Russia, one of the most beautiful cities in the world.  The class will spend the weekend sightseeing and doing cultural activities and begin our business meetings on Monday.  After an overnight train to Moscow, we will spend the rest of the week doing cultural activities and meeting with such organizations as the American Embassy, Cummins, Baker & McKensie (Russia), and others.  The group will return on Sunday March 20, 2011.  The approximate budget for the course is about $4000.  The professional advisor for this course is Nathan Feltman, Baker & Daniels, a former head of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation, and a well-known local Russian scholar.  Prof. Marjorie Lyles (mlyles@iupui.edu) would like you to let her know if you plan to take this course by Nov. 1.  It will still be possible to register for the course after that date but because of getting a visa and meetings, it is important to start early on the planning.  Please contact Prof. Lyles with any questions you have regarding this course.
D546 China in Transition1 1.5 or 3 cr.
This course provides MBA students an opportunity to gain international and/or consulting experience through either a study tour or a consulting assignment in the People's Republic of China. We may have a partner for the program which is a Chinese university. Our students may join theirs to build on their own expertise and knowledge.

1There is a 1.5 credit hour section of this course that does not include the trip to China. 
D594 Competitive Strategies in Global Industries 3 cr.
The objective is to seek to develop an understanding of the contemporary challenges and opportunities associated with developing global strategies. In light of recent developments in the global market place, old ideas about competitive strategy and implementation have become largely obsolete. Through a study of competitive industry analysis, competitor analysis, and cooperative alliance analysis, we shall gain a grasp of the basic principles that are necessary in thinking about competing in a global business environment. We will identify how to do an industry analysis and a cooperative industry analysis. This course provides an opportunity to learn about the factors affecting firm capabilities that build on industrial economic theories and on emerging theories of cooperative alliances and joint ventures. For MBA students enrolled in Summer Module 2S.
D595 International Management 1.5 cr.
This course focuses on developing skills in managing international alliances and is aimed at students who are aspiring for general management positions in technology intensive firms -both entrepreneurial and large established firms. Alliances, both domestic and international, are increasingly becoming central to a firm's competitive strategy and thus demands executives who can strategically find partners, negotiate strategic alliances, and work with them to create value. International alliances provide the extreme case of interorganizational relations, and the course learning can be easily extended to cover a wide range of joint ventures and strategic alliances including purely domestic arrangements.
D590 Independent Study in International Business cr. arr.
For advanced M.B.A. students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the M.B.A. Office and the student's faculty advisor.
J506 Leadership and Ethics in Business Environment 3 cr.
Prerequisite: J 501
Modern businesses operate in an increasingly interdependent and dynamic environment. The modern, large firm is the major institution in most contemporary industrialized societies. Many actions of firms have major impacts on society as a whole, as well as on specific stakeholders. Corporate actions are increasingly subject to media, public and government scrutiny. The nature of the constantly changing relationship between business and its major constituencies is the focus of the course. The ethical, political, economic, social, and technological considerations of various managerial decisions are investigated. The role of ethical leadership and how it relates to corporate purpose and responsibility will be a major theme of this course. For MBA students enrolled in Module 2B.
J522 Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation 1.5 cr.
In today’s business environment, it is increasingly apparent that business success is driven by a firm’s ability to create and capture value through technology and innovation.  Thus, the processes used by firms to develop new technologies, the choices they make regarding how to commercialize their technical knowledge, and the strategies they used to position and build a dominate competitive position all are important issues facing the firm. In this course, you will be introduced to a number of the central issues related to technology strategy and innovation management. We begin the course with a discussion of technological evolution and how the competitive environment affects your ability to capture value from technology. Next we will discuss the specific strategies a firm can use when seeking to commercialize a new technology. In addition, we will also look at the issues confronting large diversified corporations when shaping a winning technology strategy. For example, how do companies like Sony, Microsoft, or Eli Lilly decide in which technologies they should invest?  What new markets should they enter and how should they acquire the technological knowledge necessary to compete in those markets?  How do they maintain strategic flexibility in the face of technological obsolescence?
W511 Venture Strategy 3 cr.
Prerequisite: J 501
This course is designed for those individuals interested in creating a new business venture, acquiring an existing business, working in industries that serve the entrepreneur, or students wishing to familiarize themselves with concepts, issues, and techniques of new venture creation and entrepreneurship. There is also a strong focus on intrapreneurship, or innovation within a corporate environment. Because the sources of entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial motivation are often quite diverse, the learning goals and objectives of the students in this course are often similarly diverse. Therefore, the course is designed to offer a broad range of educational experiences, including case analyses, presenting and negotiating a financial deal, and creating a business plan or corporate change initiative.
W516 Organizational Development and Change 3 cr.
Prerequisite: J 501
Today's business environment forces executives to use every tool at their disposal to create and maintain an effective and adaptable organization. A major source of effectiveness and adaptability is the ability of managers to facilitate meetings, to assess strategic decision-making, and to coach others. This course addresses these skills by training the students to be facilitators for the MBA weekend experience (X511).
W519 Knowledge Management 3 cr.
It is now widely accepted that a firm's knowledge and its capability to learn and to share knowledge are critical competitive advantages. This course will begin by defining organizational learning and then move toward helping the business professional to do a knowledge audit. Organizations expand their knowledge through their networks and external contacts and through alternate modes of disseminating their knowledge. So it is important for firms to assess their learning intent and goals for learning externally as well as sharing and using knowledge internally. Many organizations are looking at themselves as learning organizations and think of their capacity to learn as an important capability. Taught as a web-based course through Oncourse.
W520 Turnaround Management 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: Summer II, Module 1A & 1B
This course is designed to provide the student with a process that has been shown to be effective in turning around a seriously under-performing business.  The viewpoint of the leader of the business is taken throughout the course.  The course is divided into three segments:  (1) demonstrating that it is typical for a business to deteriorate in performance over time and the overall process for correcting performance; (2) examining each step in the turnaround process, including early stage diagnosis, recovery actions, and wind-up activities; and (3) suggestions for the leader to avoid entering into a turnaround again.  Cases, guest speakers (e.g., workout specialists from banks, turnaround consultants, and company leaders who have experienced turnarounds), and lectures on each step in the process are used in the course. 
W525 New Ventures and the Venture Community of Indianapolis 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: J 501
This course is designed to support and encourage student participation in the Venture Club monthly lunch meetings. The Venture Club is a group of venture capitalists, entrepreneurs, bankers, consultants, and service providers (accountants, lawyers, etc.) who meet on a monthly basis in downtown Indianapolis. Meetings typically consist of a brief networking session, followed by two or three presentations by entrepreneurs seeking funding for business concepts, and a guest speaker. Sessions last a total of two hours, and have approximately 200 attendees. Following a brief meeting at the beginning of the semester, students would attend the monthly meetings of the Venture Club (September through April for 8 meetings, 16 hours) and participate in online chat sessions following the meeting. Each meeting would have an associated reading from Harvard Business Review, or a similar journal related to new venture development and financing. Note: this course is generally offered in an ADC or online format.
W550 Management Consulting and Strategy 3 cr.
Prerequisite: J 501
This course focuses on what is required to become a successful management consultant with emphasis on corporate strategy.  Students will have the opportunity to assume the role of a management consultant and to prepare and present a current corporate strategy product.  Key activities will include proposal preparation, fact gathering, interviewing progress review, and final report preparation and presentation.  Prospective students should have a solid understanding of the fundamentals of corporate strategy.
W590 Independent Study in Management and Administration cr. arr.
For advanced M.B.A. students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the M.B.A. Office and the student's faculty advisor.
Z590 Independent Study in Personal and Organizational Behavior cr. arr.
For advanced M.B.A. students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the M.B.A. Office and the student's faculty advisor.

Marketing

M501 Strategic Marketing Management 3 cr.
An introduction to the process of creating a market-driven organization. Specific topics include marketing strategy, market research and analysis, and the development of products and services, pricing, distribution and promotion. The course employs lecture, classroom discussion, case analyses, and field research projects. For MBA students enrolling in Module 2A.
M503 Applied Marketing Research 3 cr.
Prerequisite: M 501
The basic objective of this course is to develop the student's understanding of marketing research as it applies to marketing decision making. The course covers principles of qualitative, experimental and survey research designs, secondary and syndicated data sources, and questionnaire design. The major focus will be on the tools used to properly collect market research information. This course is usually taught Online (ADC course).
M506 Marketing Engineering 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: M 501
This course deals with the concepts, methods, and applications for decision modeling to address marketing issues such as segmentation, positioning, forecasting, new product design and development, advertising, sales force and promotion planning, and pricing. This course will provide skills to translate conceptual understanding into specific operational plans.
M511 Marketing Performance and Productivity Analysis 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: M 501
The focus of this course is on developing a comprehensive evaluation of the situation facing a product or product line. Emphasis is placed on assessing recent financial performance, identifying customer-based explanations for changes in performance, assessing the effects of marketing investments, and evaluating emerging customer needs and competitive threats.
M513 Marketing Strategy Simulation 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: M 501
A simulation course that creates an evolving market, where future decisions must be made in the context of earlier ones. Results depend on competitors' actions as well as your own decisions. The simulation provides an opportunity to increase skills in matching products and market segments, driving productivity and striving for optimum investment of marketing funds.
M550 Customer-oriented Strategies 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: M 501
Companies increasingly recognize the importance of being customer driven and the role that customer satisfaction plays in maintaining competitive advantage in the marketplace. This course provides students with a rich understanding of how this understanding can help managers make better business decisions. The course covers business-to-business, as well as individual consumer behavior.
M590 Independent Study in Marketing cr. arr.
For advanced MBA students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the MBA Office and the student's faculty advisor.
M594 International Marketing 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: M 501
Emphasizes principles and practices of marketing in the contemporary global environment. The material covers both U.S. and foreign company doing business in various countries around the world. Specifically, the objectives of the course are to provide students with some understanding of similarities and differences in the external marketing environment, different types of risks and challenges in doing business internationally and the implications of all these factors for developing marketing strategies.
M595 Special Topics in Marketing: Marketing Tests and Experiments 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: M 501
Marketing tests and experiments are among the most powerful and underutilized market research tools available to the marketing manager. If designed properly, marketing experiments can provide managers with invaluable data on the effectiveness of alternative marketing programs. This course will examine how to design, analyze and interpret marketing experiments, in order to make more data-driven marketing decisions. The class will employ a combination of lecture, cases and a class project.

Operations

K503 Statistical Analysis 1.5 cr.
This course aims to cover the fundamental quantitative skills that managers need to effectively manage data and make decisions.  The course will focus on a number of topic areas, including the analysis and management of business data, using linear regression analysis to understand relationships among variables and for use in forecasting, and probability analysis and decisions trees.    The goal is to establish a theoretical understanding of statistical decision making, as well as to develop practical skills in analyzing data using Microsoft Excel.  Statistical Analysis emphasizes the application of quantitative methods through lecture, homework assignments, cases, and computer exercises.
K510 Advanced Decision Models 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: MBA Module 1A
This course is concerned with optimization modeling. Topics covered are optimal product mix, project scheduling, aggregate planning, financial models, capital budgeting, optimal portfolio mix and multiple objectives optimization. This is an ADC course administered entirely through Oncourse, but it is not self-paced.
K516 Quantitative Decision Models 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: MBA Module 1A
This course is concerned with probability and statistical modeling. Topics covered are the application of regression-based forecasting models, simulation models and probabilistic causal models. This is an ADC course administered entirely through Oncourse, but it is not self-paced.
P501 Operations Management 3 cr.
Surveys the management of operations in manufacturing and service firms. Diverse activities, such as determining the size and type of production process, purchasing the appropriate raw materials, planning and scheduling the flow of materials and the nature and content of inventories, assuring product quality, and deciding on the production hardware and how it gets used, comprise this function of the company. Managing operations well requires both strategic and tactical skills. The topics considered include process analysis, workforce issues, materials management, quality and productivity, technology, and strategic planning, together with relevant analytical techniques. The course makes considerable use of business cases. Most classes will be spent discussing the cases assigned. For each case, students will be asked to review actual company situations and apply technical and managerial skills to recommending courses of action. Most cases will be taken from manufacturing, but some will be service-oriented. Several of the cases will focus on international companies or issues. For MBA students enrolled in Module 2A.
P509 Supply Chain Operations 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: P 501
This course is divided into two main parts. Three-quarters of this class is designed to help students begin to understand how to develop and manage efficient and effective physical distribution and logistics system. Students taking this course will learn the fundamentals of successfully exploiting supply chains by carefully coordinating distribution tasks, controlling resources (especially inventory), and leveraging technology (principally information systems). The overall goal of this part of the course is to introduce and familiarize you with the basic concepts and skills necessary for supply chain management as a manager, analyst, or consultant.

The remaining quarter of this course focuses on Sourcing (also called purchasing) and how to conduct successful negotiations. Instructional tools include lectures, readings, and a group negotiation project. The course content covers both quantitative and qualitative materials. During the term we will also consider physical distribution and sourcing issues in parts of the world with underdeveloped infrastructure.
P510 Service Operations 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: P 501
In contrast to most aspects of the other operations management courses, this one is devoted to the particular problems of designing and delivering services, as opposed to manufactured goods. Although some ideas from the management of manufacturing enterprise will spill over readily into this course, other aspects of service operations management will have no natural counterpart. The course will lean heavily on cases and most class sessions will be devoted to discussions of cases assigned for each week. These cases will be the rallying point for our learning in the course; they are drawn from many different service environments and touch on numerous operations problems.
P527 Process Improvement I 1.5 cr.
Spring 1st eight weeks
Process Improvement I covers a variety of tools and organizational procedures for understanding, analyzing and improving work processes and environments.  many of these tools and procedures have been popularized lately as "six sigma" quality management techniques, and apply readily to quite diverse business and organizational settings.
P528 Process Improvement II 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: P527. Spring 2nd eight weeks
Involves a real-world project selected and carried through by the student.  This allows application of the tools and procedures learned earlier.  Students who successfully complete both Process Improvement courses receive formal six sigma "Green Belt" certification.  Courses open to all graduate students.
P552 Project Management 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: P 501
This course begins with an introduction to project management and some of the skills and concepts surrounding good practice. Project management tools such as the critical path and Gantt charts will be reviewed as well as methods for controlling the four most important elements of any project: scope, time, cost, and resources. Various approaches to organizing projects will be introduced. The course will then move to an examination of new product development in a series of industries.
P561 Global Supply Chain Management 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: P 501, P509 is recommended
The overall goal of this course is to introduce and familiarize you with the concepts and skills necessary for supply chain management as a consultant, analyst, or manager. In this course, we will identify the major issues in supply chain management to better understand their performance. We will study the basic tools for supply chain management in production planning and inventory control, order fulfillment, and multi-stage/multi-location coordination. We will also consider the growing role of information systems in supply chains and devising supply chain strategy. During the course we will also consider issues related to the implementation of supply chain improvements.

We will use a variety of instructional tools including lectures and case discussions. The course content covers both quantitative and qualitative materials. The cases will feature a range of companies and leading edge as well as traditional distribution and logistics issues.
X573 Chinese Supply Chain: Cases 1.5 cr.
1st Summer Session-Mondays. Prerequisite: P 501
This course is designed to expose students to the challenges and opportunities of managing supply chains in the dynamic environment of China. Students will be required to analyze and discuss a number of cases of companies operating in China. Through these case discussions and the summaries by the instructor, students will learn how to make strategic and operational decisions in supply chain management. They will also learn how Chinese culture, traditions, political, legal systems and logistics infrastructure influence supply chain decisions.
P579 Strategic Management of the Healthcare Supply Chain 1.5 cr.
Spring 2011 - 2nd 8 weeks
Health care supplies are the second largest expenditure accounting for 25 to 40% of the total cost of patient care.  This course explores the strategic management of the health care supply chain with a focus on collaboration opportunities between multiple organizations.   The health care supply chain is studied from an end-to-end perspective including acute care providers, outpatient facilities, distributors, group purchasing organizations, pharmaceutical companies, medical device manufacturers, information technology services, and other supply organizations.  Over the past several years, several health care organizations have invested in strategic positioning of their supply chains through new organizational designs, new supply chain capabilities, and new collaborative business models.   This course examines these new innovations and provides the tools and concepts to apply this new knowledge to the health care industry. 
P579 Health Care Supply Chain Operations 1.5 cr.
Summer I 2011 Intensive
Pressure is mounting on health care organizations to radically improve their operational performance.  This course explores the operational management of the health care supply chain including purchasing, distribution, logistics, inventory, order fulfillment, forecasting, and coordinated planning of materials across the end-to-end supply chain.  The health care supply chain is studied from an end-to-end perspective including acute care providers, outpatient facilities, distributors, group purchasing organizations, pharmaceutical companies, medical device manufacturers, information technology services, and other supply organizations.  The course focuses on the unique aspects of health care including multiple customers (i.e. patients, physicians, clinicians, and payers) and unique product, financial, and information flows. 
P590 Independent Study in Operations Management cr. arr.
For advanced M.B.A. students engaged in special study projects. Course admission and project supervision is arranged through the M.B.A. Office and the student's faculty advisor.

General

X511 Weekend Seminar in Management Issues (Foodcorp) 1.5 cr.
The MBA Weekend Experience has students serve as the top management of a MNC. The experience helps them to focus on strategic processes such as how strategic decisions get made, how issues get raised, and where strategy meets human behavior. The experience also highlights the importance of leadership, vision, communication, and listening skills. It serves as an opportunity for the students to assess how effective they are in these skills areas. Required for students in MBA Module 1A
X518 Life Sciences Global Events and Trends 1.5 cr.
Spring 2nd eight weeks

This course exposes students to a variety of trends driving change within the life sciences industry. Topics to be reviewed include increasing worldwide cost pressures, shifts in population demographics, regulatory compliance and approvals, privacy and data protection, emerging market opportunities and ethical issues currently being faced.  Discussions will include how different companies are responding to these trends.

The course is organized by George Telthorst and taught by guest speakers who are subject matter experts drawn from different parts of the  industry. In addition to  looking at “the big picture”,  student teams will work on a “real world” project focusing on at least one specific part of the value chain. The course grade will be based on attendance, class participation and the team project.

X 519 The Life Sciences Industry from Research to Patient 1.5 cr.
Fall 2nd eight weeks
This course introduces students to the different parts of the life sciences industry and highlights some of the challenges and opportunities currently being faced.   Sections of the industry included are basic science, medical devices, pharmaceuticals/ generic/biologics , distributors, health care providers, insurers, contract services and specialized suppliers. The business of life sciences is made more successful when those involved in the industry recognize and understand the value added at each stage. A Kelley student interested in a life science career will benefit from a deeper understanding of how the whole value chain/network functions.  The course is organized by George Telthorst and taught by guest speakers who are subject matter experts drawn from different parts of the  industry.  In addition to  looking at “the big picture”,  student teams will work on a “real world” project focusing on at least one specific part of the value chain. The course grade will be based on attendance, class participation and the team project. 
X522 Enterprise Lecture Series 1.5 cr.
Required lecture series and case competition for Evening MBA students to support Enterprise Experience. For MBA students enrolled in Module 1B or 2A
X523 Enterprise Experience I 1.5 cr.
First of a two–part series for Evening MBA students involving a consulting project with a local company or business. Students will work in groups of 3 or 4 under close supervision on enterprise director. For MBA students enrolled in Module 2A or 2B.
X524 Enterprise Experience II 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: X 523
Second of a two–part series of Evening MBA students involving a consulting project with a local company or business. Students will work in small groups under close supervision of Enterprise Director.
X551 Career Management 1.5 cr.
This course is designed to provide MBAs with the skills necessary to successfully manage internal and external career transitions. Students improve their ability to package their know–how and work experience by developing a professional portfolio of resume formats, professional summaries, references and multiple work samples. Presentation skills are enhanced through behavioral interview skill practices and mock interviews. Additional topics covered include: career & job search strategy, networking, negotiations, internal development, on/off campus interviewing and market updates. Typically offered during the Summer semester only. This course is required for students to participate in GCS services in Bloomington.
X572 Entrepreneurship and Management Topics in Healthcare 1.5 cr.
Prerequisite: F 523, G 512
Healthcare spending represents a staggering 17% of the US GDP, and is expected to continue growing. It also represents a complex industry, driven by innovation and entrepreneurship. This course addresses some of those complexities, with a focus on pharmaceuticals, biotechnology and medical devices.